Our Mission

We are a community of faith centered in Christ and committed to serving God. We welcome all who seek spiritual nourishment and growth through worship, fellowship, and service.

“Never place a period where God has placed a comma.” ~ Gracie Allen

 

It was during the Age of Enlightenment.  With the Gutenberg press (1450) making the Bible available in print and English translations in the mid 1500s making it readable for the common people of England, some Brits began to object to the interpretations and practices of the Church of England.  They wished to freely gather and worship according to the dictates of their own conscience.  In order to exercise their religious freedom these “Separatists” moved across the English Channel to Holland.  Later as the Americas were being discovered, some of the group set sail on the Mayflower landing at Plymouth Rock in 1620.  These Pilgrims were joined a decade and more later by other Separatists from England and Scotland, called Puritans.  The Pilgrims and Puritans formed the Congregational Church.  With no mother church to tell them what to do or father theologian to tell them what to believe, this was an early experiment in democracy where each local church is self-governing.  Later generations of Congregationalists would guarantee this right of religious liberty to all Americans as they gave leadership to the establishment of our nation.

A century later a similar story can be told, only from continental Europe. German immigrants began to come to this country also for religious freedom. Having separated from the state church of Germany, they formed a free church known as the German Reformed Church, with a similar self-governing polity and freedom of interpretation.  As later German immigrants arrived, some having separated from the Lutheran Church and forming yet another denomination called the Evangelical Synod in North America, these religious groups of German background united together to form the Evangelical and Reformed Church (E & R).

In 1957 these two historic, American born denominations, the Congregational Church, now called the Congregational-Christian Church, and the E & R Church merged together, selecting the appropriate name, the United Church of Christ. Many other traditions have along along the way, including historic black churches from the south as the Congregationalists were active in the abolitionist movement and Pacific Islanders as Congregational missionaries brought Christianity to the Pacific.  We remain today a uniting church blending together many traditions, some old, others new.  We are a church blessed with a rich legacy and openness to the future.  As John Robinson, pastor and teacher of the Separatist community in Holland said to the departing Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower, “there is yet more truth and light to break forth from God’s holy Word.”

For further information about us as a denomination please visit our denominational website at UCC.org to learn more about who we are and what we believe.

Our Mission

We are a community of faith centered in Christ and committed to serving God. We welcome all who seek spiritual nourishment and growth through worship, fellowship, and service.

“Never place a period where God has placed a comma.” ~ Gracie Allen